Images tagged "canada-2009"


Comments

  1. Sam says:

    Hi,

    #1 – I downloaded your JMT podcast episode & will download more. Do you plan on making the podcast available through Zune?

    #2 – Do you have a Facebook page? I could not find one.

    #3 – I moderate a Wonderland Trail Facebook page (here). I invite you to “like” it & have a look around.

    Thanks for the website & your time

  2. BirdShooter says:

    Sam, I just went to Zune and submitted the feed URL. Give them 24 to 48 hours, then let me know if you are able to access the podcasts at Zune. Here’s the feed URL:

    http://feeds.feedburner.com/n2backpacking/AuGD

    Or you can always go to my website directly to pull them:

    https://n2backpacking.com/main/my-podcasts.htm

    I also have a Facebook page at this URL:

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/N2Backpackingcom/217123161657746?sk=wall and I think if you “like” it that you’ll get regular updates that way.

    I went to your Wonderland Trail Facebook page and “liked” it. I’ve hiked about 14 miles on it and always wanted to finish it. It was interesting to look at your maps. Thanks for reaching out and if you have a website and want to swap links let me know.

  3. steve says:

    You, say the A.T. is the longest trail in the U.S.,What about the PCT 2,650 miles and the CDT 3,100 miles?

  4. BirdShooter says:

    You are absolutely right about that.

  5. BirdShooter says:

    Add one more to the mix:

    Bland County’s Inaugural Festival of Trails
    Saturday, May 26, 2012
    10 AM – 8 PM at the Bland County Fairgrounds
    festivaloftrails.org

    Join Bland County in celebrating its Designation Event in becoming an Applachian Trail Community! There will be food, outdoor and craft vendors set up all day!

  6. BirdShooter says:

    K.C. becomes “30 Pack” – and a thru-hiker was born.

  7. J. Philbrick says:

    “…much as proving George Mallory didn’t actually summit Mount Everest”
    One small correction.
    George Mallory and climbing partner Andrew Irvine perished without a confirmed summit of Everest on the 3rd British Expedition to Everest June 8 or 9, 1924. Mallory’s remains were discovered in 1999. Irvine still remains missing.
    Climbers Sir Edmund Hillary & Tenzing Norgay achieved the summit on the 9th British Expedition May 29,1953.
    Jim McNeely’s evidence of Blue or Yellow Blazing, even if accepted as true, will only be a game changer to Purists & White Blazer.
    Earl will always be revered as the First.

  8. BirdShooter says:

    Camping areas on Beaver Lake are managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. To reserve a campsite, call (877) 444-6777

  9. BirdShooter says:

    A friend told me last week that camping is no longer permitted at Lick Log Creek Falls. There is supposedly a “No Camping” sign that is now posted at the site. Can someone please confirm? Thanks.

  10. Walt says:

    Roughly half of the Foothills map is covered with info boxes. It would have been helpful to have more map. Attempting to plan access routes and loops is very challenging. Wish someone would redo it or make a new one.

    • BirdShooter says:

      Walt – the Foothills Trail Guidebook is excellent and shows access routes and loops in detail. I highly recommend it if you plan to spend any time on the Foothills Trail. The Foothills Trail Conference sells both the map and book on their website if you can’t find them at Amazon.

  11. BirdShooter says:

    The Boardwalk River Trail can only be accessed when the Chattahoochee Nature Center is open. So check in at main entrance (and expect to pay a fee). The Nature Center has a very cool raptor center outside – so it’s worth the price of admission.

  12. BirdShooter says:

    Apparently the mudslide issue goes way beyond the Smokies….

    FOREST SERVICE ALERT

    Jan. 17, 2013

    Warning: Travel on Forest Service Roads Discouraged

    ASHEVILLE, N.C. – The U.S. Forest Service National Forests in North Carolina is encouraging drivers to stay off all Forest Service roads in the Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests until the storm passes.

    Heavy rain has produced mudslides in the two national forests. Travel conditions are also dangerous because of the potential for washed out roads and flooding, downed trees and other hazards.

    Road closures thus far include: Fires Creek, Tuni Gap and Tatham Gap roads on the Tusquitee Ranger District, Nantahala National Forest. Additional roads closures may be forthcoming today or tomorrow across the two national forests.

    In the Appalachian Ranger District, Pisgah National Forest: Twelve Mile Road in Haywood County is mostly blocked because of a mudslide; and Forest Service Road 288 is flooded. The two roads are not officially closed, but travel is discouraged.

    The safety of national forest visitors and employees is the top priority of the Forest Service.

    #

  13. Harry says:

    Hi, great site! With Virginia I added Big Meadows Campground on my site http://TheGreatOutdoorsBlog.com. Big Meadows has tons of ver accessible trails including the A.T… Great spot for the whole family.

  14. BirdShooter says:

    The latest report is that US 441 will be out until June 2013 while repairs are made.

  15. Lynsey says:

    Do you know anything about Tallulah Gorge in regards to dogs?

    • BirdShooter says:

      From the State Park website:

      PET RULES: For animals’ safety, pets are not allowed on the gorge floor or on any trail accessing the gorge. Leashed pets are still allowed on rim trails.

  16. BirdShooter says:

    I saw a news interview with a couple that owned a cabin he frequently raided.

    Seems he likes Budweiser but not Bud Light and Miller Light. Over time, the owner learned to stock only light beers.

  17. BirdShooter says:

    US 441 is OPEN!

    CHEROKEE, N.C. — Newfound Gap Road in Great Smoky Mountains National Park reopened at 10 a.m. today (April 15th), only three months after a major landslide took out a 200-foot section of pavement six miles south of Newfound Gap.

    http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2013/apr/15/newfound-gap-road-in-smokies-opens-a-month-ahead/

  18. BirdShooter says:

    It’s actually the Coosa Backcountry Trail and not the Coosa Bald Trail as I said in the video.

    Earlier guidebooks and maps have it blazed as yellow, but the Coosa Backcountry Trail is actually blazed in green from what we saw in April 2013.

    Another thing we noticed is that it’s the blue-blazed Duncan Ridge Trail that crosses the summit of Coosa Bald and not the Coosa Backcountry Trail. It’s a short (and roughly 0.4 mile) side hike to Coosa Bald from the Coosa Backcountry Trail, but the green blazed trail doesn’t actually cross the summit.

    Also – there’s no water on the summit and there are very few campsites, especially in the summer months. The once open area has almost entirely been reclaimed by Mother Nature.

  19. BirdShooter says:

    From WhiteBlaze.net this week. Hang your food or better yet … take a bear canister if you camp overnight between Neels Gap and Tesnatee Gap on the Appalachian Trail in Georgia:

    “Woke up at 7:00 am sharp when the lights came on. Someone announced pancakes were ready so everyone got up quickly. When I stepped outside into the “living area” I found two girls, Sandy and Maddie, stretched out on the flood in their bags. They said they had no where else to go. I remember meeting them the night previous at dinner. There was no more room in the hostel and all cabins were rented so they continued on in the evening an additional 3 miles up the trail and made camp. Unfortunately they slept with their food in the tent and were attacked by a bear. The area between Neel Gap and Tesnatee Gap is known for very aggressive bears. They grabbed all they could, their sleeping bags, and returned down the mountain to the hostel.”

  20. BirdShooter says:

    From WhiteBlaze.net this week. Hang your food or better yet … take a bear canister if you camp overnight between Neels Gap and Tesnatee Gap on the Appalachian Trail in Georgia:

    “Woke up at 7:00 am sharp when the lights came on. Someone announced pancakes were ready so everyone got up quickly. When I stepped outside into the “living area” I found two girls, Sandy and Maddie, stretched out on the flood in their bags. They said they had no where else to go. I remember meeting them the night previous at dinner. There was no more room in the hostel and all cabins were rented so they continued on in the evening an additional 3 miles up the trail and made camp. Unfortunately they slept with their food in the tent and were attacked by a bear. The area between Neel Gap and Tesnatee Gap is known for very aggressive bears. They grabbed all they could, their sleeping bags, and returned down the mountain to the hostel.”

  21. BirdShooter says:

    Still lots of bear activity in this area. Signs are posted at the Trailhead. Definitely hang your food!!!

  22. Marlo Sedki says:

    Steve: I really enjoyed this article. It’s sad that the family has passed on, but so nice that you have the wonderful memories.

    Marlo

  23. Nick says:

    Hey Birdshooter, don’t know if you know, but your subscribe button doesn’t seem to work. I’ve tried to subscribe a few times but I always get a message that reads ‘Error: confirmation email resend failed’ Don’t want you to miss out on subscribers. Really enjoy the show. Best wishes Nick

  24. BirdShooter says:

    It’s fixed Nick. Thanks for the heads up and the listens!

  25. Nick says:

    Great podcast – really good interview.

    Thanks very much.

  26. David Thompson says:

    How does one get a password to access your site?
    The site looks great and would love to be able to see more.Thanks,
    David

  27. BirdShooter says:

    Glad you enjoyed it. Jester captures the trail experience well. Let me know if there are other trail folks that have a good story to tell.

  28. BirdShooter says:

    Passwords are in place per friends requests (that don’t want their photos, videos, etc. publicly available).

    And in some cases I don’t have publishing rights to the maps, etc.

    So there’s no subscription based option at this time. Sorry.

    But I’ve tried to make as much content as possible open to the public.

  29. BirdShooter says:
  30. Mark says:

    Is this the same Rogerson’s near Port Loring Ontario that would do the flyouts?

  31. BirdShooter says:

    It’s been a long time, but I believe you are right about that.

  32. BirdShooter says:

    Apparently, Baxter State Park doesn’t need federal or state funding at all. Here’s an interesting article about the increasing frustration with the park and the thru-hiking/speed hiking community…

    Scott Jurek vs. Baxter State Park: The Clash of Commercial Sports and Wilderness Preservation

    http://appalachiantrials.com/baxter-state-park-vs-scott-jurek-the-clash-of-commercial-sports-and-wilderness-preservation/

  33. Andy Rayner says:

    Just Got back from Africa, where I work part of the year, each year as a humanitarian. I am a Commercial Fishing Captain up here in Prince Edward Island, Canada as well. ON return from Mali, my oldest son and I who do some hiking (He’s 25, and we did 300km trail last summer in 9 days), began to catch up on your podcasts as we build traps and repair gear and nets. We have listened to them all to this point.
    We were very moved by your interview with on this podcast and the story of Bill, and Blind Courage. Bought the book as soon as we got home from the workshop.
    We enjoy the podcast very much. Keep up the great work.
    Andy & Ben

    • BirdShooter says:

      Bill Irwin’s story is an inspiring one – as is Grandma Gatewood’s if you haven’t read the book (or heard the podcast) yet:
      https://n2backpacking.com/episode-31-grandma-gatewoods-walk/

      Thanks for reaching out Andy! I spend a week in Canada every year, but haven’t explored Prince Edward Island yet. The International A.T. is on my list – so that will put me nearby and I look forward to exploring the northeastern provinces of Canada at some point in the next few years.

  34. Adventurous Aubrey says:

    Nice view and the flowers are lovely, We also have waterfalls here in the Philippines and if you’re planning to backpack your welcome to our country. Lots backpackers been in the Philippines. 🙂

  35. Michael says:

    So far my favorite one in your series. (not caught up yet).
    I love all the stories from the trail. Very cool!

  36. Mark says:

    I was greatly inspired by the podcast that you recorded and described your hiking experiences in the GSMNP. I share your podcast stories with my wife and youngest daughter virtually every evening. I commute 1.5 hours one-way to Nashville, so I have a lot of podcast time. I’ve listened to every podcast on N2 Backpacking and have started them over for a second run through. No matter what kind of a day I’ve had at work, your podcasts can place me on the AT, PCT, CDT, and others trails around the world. Thank you for such a high quality podcast.

  37. BirdShooter says:

    Great to hear Mark. It’s always nice to know that your podcast is valued since it is a true labor of love. Best wishes

  38. john parker says:

    I listened to this and didn’t hear Andrew Skurka, Ryan Jordan, Henry Shires and several others mentioned. Possibly it was the way you framed the question but these guys have had as much impact as Ray Jardine! or mebbe even more. And of course Grandma Gatewood!

    • BirdShooter says:

      We did discuss Grandma Gatewood, but the names you mention didn’t show up in the hiking/backpacking forums as much as the others. I agree that Skurka, Jordan, and Shires all aided the long distance and lightweight hiking mindset and deserve a nod. We’ll likely give a shout out to some of these folks in a future show – as there’s been plenty of feedback on the topic. Thanks for reaching out.

  39. john Baranowski says:

    I enjoyed your blog about Grandma Gatewood. When I was a Boy Scout in 1955 hiking the AT near Front Royal Virginia I shared a shelter with Grandma Gatewood. At that time the shelters had bunks with springs on top of them and she slept on the bare springs. She carried a feed sac with just a few things in it. One thing she carried was a small hand gun and she made it well known that she had it in her sac. We talked for a few hours before bed time and she told us (there were 4 Boy Scouts) she stopped at selected houses along the trail to have her meals. She had a sore ankle and walked with a limp.

    I really enjoy your pod cast but I wish you wouldn’t put too much emphasis on beer drinking. There are a whole lot of us who do not drink and enjoy nature at it’s best. I have been hiking for 45 years and have enjoyed being in nature with a lot of good people. Try my blog at http:/christianhiker@blogspot.com. I am just an occasional blogger not nearly as pro as you.

    • BirdShooter says:

      Grandma Gatewood is a special lady and certainly an inspiration for many of the thru-hikers that followed. If you haven’t read Ben Montgomery’s book yet (Grandma Gatewood’s Walk) I highly recommend it. It sounds like she had numerous encounters with youth on the Trail and seems to have made a lasting impression on most of them.

      We have been known to kick back a few brews around the campfire, but the bulk of these shows are not recorded in the backcountry – so if you sample the entire series I think you’ll find that is not our focus. Thanks for the feedback and best wishes.

  40. john Baranowski says:

    I enjoyed your blog about Grandma Gatewood. When I was a Boy Scout in 1955 hiking the AT near Front Royal Virginia I shared a shelter with Grandma Gatewood. At that time the shelters had bunks with springs on top of them and she slept on the bare springs. She carried a feed sac with just a few things in it. One thing she carried was a small hand gun and she made it well known that she had it in her sac. We talked for a few hours before bed time and she told us (there were 4 Boy Scouts) she stopped at selected houses along the trail to have her meals. She had a sore ankle and walked with a limp.

    I really enjoy your pod cast but I wish you wouldn’t put too much emphasis on beer drinking. There are a whole lot of us who do not drink and enjoy nature at it’s best. I have been hiking for 45 years and have enjoyed being in nature with a lot of good people. Try my blog at http:/christianhiker@blogspot.com. I am just an occasional blogger not nearly as pro as you.

  41. BirdShooter says:

    Grandma Gatewood is a special lady and certainly an inspiration for many of the thru-hikers that followed. If you haven’t read Ben Montgomery’s book yet (Grandma Gatewood’s Walk) I highly recommend it. It sounds like she had numerous encounters with youth on the Trail and seems to have made a lasting impression on most of them.

    We have been known to kick back a few brews around the campfire, but the bulk of these shows are not recorded in the backcountry – so if you sample the entire series I think you’ll find that is not our focus. Thanks for the feedback and best wishes.

  42. Kyle says:

    I have started listening to your podcast and really enjoy it. Is there anyway to get episodes 1-15 in iTunes?

  43. ThruTrain says:

    Hey BirdShooter @N2Backpacking Ep#41 was great, well done. The ’95 interviews were timeless. The same people are out on the AT right now.

  44. Rebecca says:

    Congratulations on an outstanding podcast! As an experienced podcaster myself with over 180 episodes, I appreciate your professionalism

  45. BirdShooter says:

    Thank you Rebecca. We are working on Therm Rider’s professionalism – just kidding 🙂

  46. Flash says:

    Hey Birdshooter I love your podcast ! I am looking for the portal for paying for 10 archive downloads and I cant find it anywhere. Thanks for your reporting writing and radio creations !

  47. Rudy says:

    I have been a subscriber to your podcast for over three years! Love it and you give me inspiration. In fact I have since started my own podcast here in Washington State cascadehikerpodcast.com

    I love your fireside talks and was wondering what happened to the rest of episode 42? Seemed like it cut short there.

    Anyway, keep up the great work
    Rudy

    • BirdShooter says:

      Thanks Rudy. I just subscribed to your podcast and will check it out. I tested Episode 42 and it seems to be working. So maybe you just caught my web host when they were doing maintenance or something. Give it another try if you haven’t already. Best wishes, BirdShooter

  48. Chris Blanchard says:

    I wanted to read about the spooky Maryland camping night-

  49. Jane says:

    Hi Bird Shooter,

    Been listening to your podcast.
    Just gotta say thanks. I’ve been planning to thru hike the JMT next May and I listen to your podcast everyday at work and nothing gets me more excited to get out of here!
    “Episode 44: Trail Days 1995” was a real treat.
    Made me real how different people talk nowadays.

    Anyways, I was looking through some of your photos (from the california hikes pages).
    They’re beautiful. I was wondering what type of camera you use.
    I’ve been looking for a light film point and shoot to bring along with me on my hikes.
    Let me know.

    Thanks Bird Shooter

    • BirdShooter says:

      In reply to Jane.

      My pleasure – and check out the JMT podcast if you haven’t already. It’s a bit dated – Episode #1! – but if you are about to hit the Trail it is worth a listen if you haven’t heard it already:
      https://n2backpacking.com/episode-1-the-john-muir-trail/

      In terms of cameras – I’ve used a bunch over the years but lately have been using a Canon Powershot Elph because they are fairly lightweight, inexpensive, and take decent photos and video. It’s also easy to hike with it in my pocket or hipbelt so I can snap pics on the fly.

      Sounds like a heavy snow year on the JMT! Let us know if you make it out.

      BirdShooter

  50. Jane says:

    Hi Bird Shooter,

    Been listening to your podcast.
    Just gotta say thanks. I’ve been planning to thru hike the JMT next May and I listen to your podcast everyday at work and nothing gets me more excited to get out of here!
    “Episode 44: Trail Days 1995” was a real treat.
    Made me real how different people talk nowadays.

    Anyways, I was looking through some of your photos (from the california hikes pages).
    They’re beautiful. I was wondering what type of camera you use.
    I’ve been looking for a light film point and shoot to bring along with me on my hikes.
    Let me know.

    Thanks Bird Shooter

  51. BirdShooter says:

    In reply to Jane.

    My pleasure – and check out the JMT podcast if you haven’t already. It’s a bit dated – Episode #1! – but if you are about to hit the Trail it is worth a listen if you haven’t heard it already:
    https://n2backpacking.com/episode-1-the-john-muir-trail/

    In terms of cameras – I’ve used a bunch over the years but lately have been using a Canon Powershot Elph because they are fairly lightweight, inexpensive, and take decent photos and video. It’s also easy to hike with it in my pocket or hipbelt so I can snap pics on the fly.

    Sounds like a heavy snow year on the JMT! Let us know if you make it out.

    BirdShooter

  52. BirdShooter says:

    LOL, I am actually working on an e-book of short stories, and the night in Maryland will definitely make it in there! Might need another year to get it done though.

  53. Jason Thomas says:

    Loved this episode. Sounded like you were all enjoying the time and the beer was flowing! Might be time to invest in a two mic setup as it was sometimes hard to hear the guys further away.

    • BirdShooter says:

      Agreed Jason. Had the same issue on Episode #35. I need to find something that is lightweight and works with my existing set-up. Any suggestions are welcome.

  54. Renaldo King says:

    How did 30 Pack get his name?

  55. Lone Wolf says:

    I have not listened to this one yet, but the last fire side chat concerning the Outside gear review was the best show ever!…. I too loved the format of the fireside chat that you did in early podcasts and now you have nailed the mood you were looking for. I felt like I was there and part of the group of hikers. Please do more shows like this one. What about talking about hiking shoes and cook pots / stoves around the fire with this group of Hikers?

    Thanks again, Lone Wolf

    • BirdShooter says:

      Lone Wolf, you are in luck. We are already planning a follow-up to EPISODE 42: MOST SIGNIFICANT BACKCOUNTRY GEAR OF ALL TIME. It’s a perfect subject to discuss on a podcast, and frankly we only covered about half of the items in the Outside Magazine article. Plus the topic is ripe with opinions – which makes for good banter around the campfire.

      If you liked the “Rookie Mistakes” series (Episode #24 and #32) we might get to that next. Backpacker Magazine ran their own list of 52 Common Mistakes which merits a debate on our next multi-day backpacking trip – scheduled for South Dakota in June. Stay tuned … and thanks for reaching out.

  56. Lone Wolf says:

    The last fire side chat concerning the Outside gear review was the best show ever!…. I too loved the format of the fireside chat that you did in early podcasts and now you have nailed the mood you were looking for. I felt like I was there and part of the group of hikers. Please do more shows like this one. What about talking about hiking shoes and cook pots / stoves around the fire with this group of Hikers?

    • BirdShooter says:

      Lone Wolf, you are in luck. We are already planning a follow-up to EPISODE 42: MOST SIGNIFICANT BACKCOUNTRY GEAR OF ALL TIME. It’s a perfect subject to discuss on a podcast, and frankly we only covered about half of the items in the Outside Magazine article. Plus the topic is ripe with opinions – which makes for good banter around the campfire.

      If you liked the “Rookie Mistakes” series (Episode #24 and #32) we might get to that next. Backpacker Magazine ran their own list of 52 Common Mistakes which merits a debate on our next multi-day backpacking trip – scheduled for South Dakota in June. Stay tuned … and thanks for reaching out.

  57. I wonder if the Klondike Gold Rush National Park has a ranger who has an opinion as to whether Klondike Mike carried a piano on his back up the Chilkoot Pass in 1898? This is one of the most famous stories told about the Chilcoot Pass. I am preparing a presentation to the Irish Literary and Historical Society in San Francisco re: Michael Ambrose Mahoney (aka Klondike Mike) He was my father’s first cousin. I would be interested in your opinion, and whether there was any contemporary evidence for this event.

  58. Jeremy says:

    Do you have a link to his YouTube channel? Would like to follow the Camino trip. I couldn’t find it under his trail name. Thanks.

  59. Carl says:

    Just a correction on the facility use – backpacking and overnight camping are permitted in the Francis Marion National Forest, where I’on Swamp is located. There’s a nice spot about a mile south of the trail head off I’on Swamp Rd with a fire ring and open space to camp out. I go at least twice a year! Highly recommended, it’s a beautiful area – just watch out for the gators!

  60. Kendall says:

    Keep in mind that drones also affect wildlife. Hawks can be injured when they try to defend their territory. Many other animals experience stress or hide.

  61. Jim says:

    I listen to a lot of backpacking podcasts and I applaud your approach and content. I like that you avoid the exhaustive “life on the trail” content of many other podcasts. It is also refreshi ng that you avoid trying to be cute or always funny. Last, I’m happy to never hear you talk about poop!

    Your approach is sincere and exploratory. Your topics have refreshingly expanded past the Triple Crown Trails which at this point are over done imo. Your show about Everest and the Kungsleden were inspiring and interesting. My wife and I were in the Everest region in 2017 and could relate the description of the Sherpa people.

    Keep up the interesting content!

    • BirdShooter says:

      Thanks Jim and really appreciate the feedback. And agreed .. I don’t get what is so fascinating about poop and why all the backpacking podcasts constantly talk about it! You are spot on with that.

      Hope to have a show out soon on Top 12 reasons people die in the wilderness – should be a good one.

      Best wishes, BirdShooter

  62. Julee Hawj says:

    I love your podcast. But it was a bit frustrating with your previous audio problems. I used to only be able to listen to your podcast with headphones on. I’m so excited you’ve got yourself a studio!! The audio was amazing on your last podcast “RIM TO RIM TO RIM”. Please keep putting out new podcast. Looking forward to your new stuff!

    • BirdShooter says:

      Thanks for the feedback. Yes … the new studio was overdue and is a big improvement. Now I just have to master recording around the campfire. Capturing 3-5 people as they sit in the backcountry is a bit of a challenge, and lugging 10 lbs of audio equipment on a backpacking trip isn’t realistic. Hopefully tech advancements will catch up with us at some point. Glad you enjoy the show. Should have another podcast out in a few weeks. Best wishes, BirdShooter

  63. Karl says:

    I just wanted to say thanks for your podcasts, which I’ve thoroughly enjoyed. You have a great voice for it.

  64. Amy Rogerson berardi says:

    Is there or was there an actual Rogerson’s Lodge? My father seems to remember his family talking about one when he was a child.

  65. Ken Strange says:

    Steve,

    I may seem somewhat prejudiced, but this was one of the best podcasts I’ve been a guest on. You have a wonderful interviewing style which made me feel like I was talking to an old hiking friend. Great questions, great preparation going into this podcast. Makes me want to keep coming back to hear some of your other episodes. Keep up the great work!

    This is a five star episode!!!

    Ken Strange

  66. James Simmons says:

    Here are my top 3:

    3. “Song in the Breeze” by The Outlaws
    2. “Keep Pushing” REO Speedwagon
    1. “Out in the Country” 3 Dog Night

    Thoughts? Comments?

  67. boot says:

    1. Morning Dew, Grateful Dead, London 5.26.1972

    2. Hard Sun, Eddie Vedder

    3. Take Me Home Country Roads, Toots & The Maytals

  68. DaBoyz says:

    1. Ain’t Life Grand
    2. Surprise Valley
    3. Honey Bee

    BirdShooter, those other guys are punks … Panic Rules !

  69. BirdShooter says:

    Surprise Valley – one of my favorites from Panic…

  70. Oh, wow! Hiking GA AT next month so DEF taking my bear can? Thanks so much for your first class podcast. Have listened to all and learned / enjoyed so much!

  71. Thur-Train says:

    Hey @N2Backpacking Ep#73 was fabulous. Great show, a lot of fun. But what, noone chose ‘Wagon Wheel’ OCMS?

  72. BirdShooter says:

    Unfortunately, pets are no longer allowed on the boardwalk.